Celebrate #Pakistani Cuisine with Shehzad Hussain a perfect #recipe for #Easter

Further recipes and interview in Chaat! issue 28

NEHARI

LAMB NEHARI

Regarded as the national dish of Pakistan, nehari is known for its piquancy

and texture. The name has its origins in Arabic and means ‘day’ or ‘morning’

and it was typically served to kings and nobility around sunrise, after the

Muslim early morning Fajr prayer. The Mughals brought it to the Indian

subcontinent and it soon became a nationwide tradition among the Muslims.

The dish comprises slow-cooked large, tender shanks or pieces of beef,

mutton or lamb and, while not completely authentic, even chicken. Known

for its spiciness, it is a delicious curry with a thick, flavoursome sauce that is

often sold with naan fresh from the tandoor in specialist restaurants and

roadside cafes early in the morning, particularly on weekends.

 

SERVES 4

2 medium onions, peeled and halved

120ml/4fl oz/1⁄2 cup vegetable oil

2 bay leaves

900g/2lb leg of lamb on the bone, cut into 7.5–10cm/3–4in cubes, or 3–4 medium lamb shanks

15ml/1 tbsp garam masala

15ml/1 tbsp ground coriander

10ml/2 tsp garlic pulp

10ml/2 tsp ginger pulp

5ml/1 tsp freshly grated nutmeg

10ml/2 tsp ground fennel seeds

10ml/2 tsp paprika

30ml/2 tbsp tomato paste

7.5ml/11⁄2 tsp salt

1 litre/13⁄4 pints/4 cups water, plus 60ml/4 tbsp to make a flour paste

30ml/2 tbsp plain (all-purpose) flour

15ml/1 tbsp chopped fresh coriander (cilantro)

2 lemons, cut into wedges, to serve

naan or parathas, to serve

TO GARNISH

4–6 fresh green chillies, chopped

45ml/3 tbsp chopped fresh coriander (cilantro)

45ml/3 tbsp peeled and finely sliced fresh root ginger

 

1 Process the onions in a food processor to form a pulp.

2 Heat 60ml/4 tbsp of the oil in a very large pan over a medium heat and fry the

bay leaves for about 30 seconds. Add the meat, followed by the garam masala.

Fry for about 5 minutes, to seal the meat.

3 Add the ground coriander, garlic, ginger, nutmeg, ground fennel seeds,

paprika and tomato paste and stir to combine. Add the salt and stir once more,

then remove from the heat.

4 In a separate pan, heat the remaining oil over a medium heat, add the pulped

onion and fry for about 10 minutes, until golden brown.

5 Add the onion pulp to the lamb and combine everything together. Pour in the

water, return to the heat and bring to the boil.

6 Reduce the heat to low and cook for 45–60 minutes, checking occasionally and

stirring. The curry is ready once the liquid has reduced by at least half and the

meat is tender and falling off the bone.

7 Dissolve the flour in the 60ml/4 tbsp water, whisking it well to make a smooth

paste. Pour this over the lamb while slowly and gently stirring the curry. Cook for

a further 7–10 minutes, stirring frequently, until the sauce is thick.

8 Using a ladle, transfer the curry to a serving dish, or individual deep plates if

using shanks – allowing one per person. Serve garnished with chillies, fresh

coriander, and ginger, and accompany with lemon wedges, and naan or parathas.

The Food and Cooking of Pakistan: Traditional Dishes From The Home Kitchen by Shehzad Husain (HB, Lorenz Books, Dec-16, £14.99) is available now on Amazon.co.uk

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Slow Cooked Cumin and Coriander Spiced Vegetables with Pearl Barley

This rich and flavoursome veggie stew is a great way to experiment with your rice cooker, demonstrating that this must-have kitchen gadget can do more than serve up bowls of fluffy basmati. Autumnal veg and piquant spices create a wonderful, and surprisingly light, stew full of delicious flavours and delightful textures.

Vegetarian and vegan friendly, the slow cooked cumin and coriander spiced vegetables with pearl barley proves that hearty dishes needn’t rely on a meaty base.

Quick and easy to make, and a hit with the whole family; this recipe is great for a midweek meal. Using a lot of kitchen essentials and spice rack mainstays, the recipe won’t add a great deal of burden on your weekly shopping list. Plus, if you’ve got young children, this is a great way of getting them to eat a number of veggies they’re usually reluctant to sample.

We’d recommend serving this dish with fresh, crusty bread on the side – great for dipping, scooping and wiping – making sure you don’t miss any of the wonderful spice. Serve direct from the rice cooker, when the vegetables and pearl barley are piping hot.

Here is the recipe for slow cooked cumin and coriander spiced vegetables with pearl barley.

Cook Time: 30 Minutes

Servings: 4-6 People

Ingredients:

  • 1 small squash (peeled, cut into chunks)
  • 2 cups fine beans (topped, tailed and halved)
  • 2 courgettes (sliced)
  • 2 leeks (sliced)
  • 5 carrots (peeled and sliced)
  • 1 medium red onion (sliced)
  • 600g chopped tomatoes
  • 80g pearl barley
  • 1tsp cumin seeds
  • 1tsp coriander seeds
  • 1tsp dried chilli flakes
  • 3 cups vegetable stock
  • 2tbsp vegetable oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • Crusty bread (to serve)

Method:

 Using your rice cooker, sauté the carrots, courgettes, squash and red onion in the vegetable oil.

  1. After a couple of minutes, add the chopped tomatoes, pearl barley, spices and vegetable stock.
  2. Switch to cook mode and cover, cooking for 15 minutes.
  3. Stir in the leeks and beans, cover again and cook for a further 10 minutes.
  4. Serve with the fresh, crusty bread.

Original recipe from: www.crockpot.co.uk

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Anjula Devi’s Healthy Indian Inspired Christmas Feast

For anyone looking forward to enjoying a Christmas with a difference, chef and author, Anjula Devi, has created a Christmas feast with hints of carefully selected spices, all containing amazing health properties. Anjula’s Christmas banquet features:

  • Caramelised carrots with chilli flakes, jaggery and smoked ginger juice. Finished with a drop of orange liquor.
  •  Sticky parsnips with maple syrup and mandarin peel. Finished with nigella seeds.
  •  Roast potatoes with burnt garlic, cumin and red onion.
  •  Brussels sprouts with crushed coriander seeds, fennel and twice-roasted chestnuts in butter and garlic.
  •  24 hour marinated roast turkey with garlic, cumin, roasted dry crushed chillies, crushed coriander seeds, natural yogurt, pomegranate, lemon zest and juice. Finished with fresh chopped   coriander.
  •  Sausages wrapped in bacon, with caramelised shallots and fenugreek leaves
  •  Cranberry sauce with a hint of star anise and black peppercorns.
  •  Bread sauce with cinnamon, cloves, bay leaf and roasted onion. Finished with a little chilli oil.

Celebrated chef and champion of authentic Indian cooking, Anjula Devi is head of her own eponymous ‘Authentic Indian Cookery School’. Anjula has never been one to follow the crowd, and she loves creating healthy and unique recipes.

This talent began as a gift shared by her beloved father during a childhood in which he imparted all of his culinary wisdom. The essential spices, which form the foundation of much traditional Indian cuisine, remain central to Anjula’s culinary approach. The fifty-year-old Tiffin tin, which her father took with him to work every single day, is always close by, even today.

Speaking about Indian cuisine, Anjula says “There is a whole treasure chest of recipes, flavour combinations and beautiful ingredients which are often completely neglected, along with all of their amazing health benefits. All of my recipes are balanced and healthy; I love cooking with fresh vegetables. I want to inspire as many people as possible to cook delicious, healthy food, just like my father did all those years ago.”

Anjula’s Indian inspired Christmas dishes make a great alternative to traditional roast dinners.

Anjula has a ‘How To’ cookery book and range of Anjula Devi cooking utensils currently online and in Lakeland stores throughout the UK. http://www.lakeland.co.uk/anjula

Her new cookery book ‘Spice for Life’ is being released in spring 2017

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#Bonfire Night Orange Cream Brandy Snaps

These are old-fashioned, lacy, gingery brandy snaps filled with cream. They’re relatively easy to make – the fiddly bit is the shaping and filling that follows – just remember to give them plenty of space while they’re in the oven and get to the shaping soon after they come out.

Ingredients

125g unsalted butter

125g light soft brown sugar

125g golden syrup

4 tsp lemon juice

125g plain flour, sifted

1 tsp ground ginger

For the cream

600ml double cream

1 tbsp icing sugar

1 tbsp orange flower water

the zest of 1 orange

Makes 15-20

  • Preheat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas mark 4.
  • Stir the butter, sugar, golden syrup and lemon juice in a
pan over a moderate heat until the butter has melted and all the sugar has dissolved. Remove from the heat and stir in the flour and ginger, mixing to a smooth paste.
  • Once the mixture is completely cool, roll in to walnut-sized balls. Press them on to a greased tray, spacing them well apart as they will spread.
  • Bake for 5-7 minutes, until golden brown a­nd lacy. Allow them to relax for a second or two, then mould them in to
a tube shape by gently wrapping them round the handle of a wooden spoon. If they cool before you can mould them, put them back in the oven for a minute to soften again.
  • Whip the double cream and gently fold in the icing sugar, orange flower water and orange zest. Shortly before serving, put the cream in a large piping bag and fill each brandy snap. Stack them, Jenga-style, on a plate and serve immediately, while they’re chewy and crispy.

 

Bill’s was founded as a fresh produce shop and café in Lewes, East Sussex by greengrocer Bill Collison in 2000. There are now over 70 restaurants across the UK, serving British classics made with fresh and locally sourced ingredients.

They’ve recently launched a new menu which will run throughout October and November, serving warming dishes such as sticky toffee apple pork ribs, wild mushroom soup and apple and salted caramel walnut crumble. The menu will be available at all sites throughout the UK.

The recipe is from Bill’s Cook Eat Smile cookbook, sold in all Bill’s stores and on Amazon. RRP £20.

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Gunpowder chicken #fireworks

Enjoy the traditional British celebration with an Oriental twist this November and treat your taste-buds to a gunpowder of flavours.

Chinese cuisine has always been an all-time favourite in the UK, but why should the treats stop at a Saturday night takeaway?

With this in mind, Wing Yip has created two exclusive recipes bursting with flavour to enjoy with friends and family this bonfire night.

More recipes www.chaatmagazine.co.uk

Gunpowder chicken

Do something different than the traditional hamburgers and hotdogs.

Serves 2-3

Ingredients:

500g boneless chicken thighs
1 tbsp Wing Yip Dark Soy Sauce
2 tbsp sunflower/vegetable oil
8-9 dried whole red chillies
1 tsp Szechuan peppercorns, lightly crushed
200g roasted peanuts
2 spring onions, thinly sliced

Sauce:
1 ltr chicken stock
4 tbsp Wing Yip Dark Soy Sauce
2 tbsp rice vinegar
1tbsp Chinese black vinegar
1 tsp sugar or honey
1 tbsp cornflour

 

Method:

  1. Slice the chicken into strips and marinate in 1 tbsp dark soy sauce for 10 minutes.
  2. For the sauce, bring the chicken stock to the boil and reduce by three-quarters so you’re left with 250ml. Combine the reduced chicken stock with all remaining ingredients in a bowl and whisk until the cornflour has dissolved.
  3. Heat the sunflower oil over a medium heat in a wok and cook the chicken in batches so that you don’t overcrowd the wok. Stir-fry each batch for 2-3 minutes, or until the chicken is sealed on all sides and is starting to brown. Remove from the oil and set aside.
  4. Add the dried red chillies to the wok and quickly stir-fry for 5 seconds taking care not to burn them. Return the chicken to the wok adding the Szechuan peppercorns and peanuts. Constantly stir-fry for another minute.
  5. Pour the sauce into the wok making sure to coat all of the ingredients. Keep stir-frying over a medium heat until the sauce thickens and the chicken is cooked through. This should take another 4-5 minutes.
  6. Once cooked and the sauce has thickened serve immediately with steamed rice or noodles and garnish with the spring onions.

With four stores across the UK, in Birmingham, Manchester, Cricklewood and Croydon, the UK’s leading Oriental grocer, Wing Yip, brings traditional Oriental cuisine one step closer to UK homes. From fresh produce to delicious sauces and interesting spices.

 

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