Bunny chow #StreetFood South African Curry

Street food has become so popular over the last decade in the UK, but there are still many regions of street food still to be explored by UK diners, here is recipe from South Africa!

Bunny chow is simply a hollow bread roll stuffed with curry – not made with real bunny, but with tender pieces of stewed lamb. In its native South Africa it is often spooned into large hollowed-out loaves of bread, which are designed to be eaten with your hands – quite a challenge, even for the most dextrous! For ease of eating I prefer to use smaller rolls, so really hungry diners may want more than one.

Order your copy of Chaat! to get more recipes like this 

SERVES 4–8, ALLOWING 1–2 EACH, DEPENDING ON GREED

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

700g lamb leg steaks, cut into 3cm cubes

2 onions, roughly chopped

3 garlic cloves, chopped

4cm piece fresh root ginger, chopped

1 tablespoon cumin seeds

2 teaspoons fennel seeds

1–2 teaspoons dried chilli flakes, to taste

1 cinnamon stick

4 vine tomatoes, chopped

2 tablespoons garam masala

550–600g (around 2 large)

potatoes, peeled and cut into 3cm cubes

8 large crusty white bread rolls

salt and freshly ground black pepper

a small bunch of coriander, chopped, to garnish

1 small red onion, thinly sliced, to garnish

Spices for the recipe go to store.eastendfoods.co.uk/

Place the vegetable oil in a large, heavy-based pan and set over a high heat. When it’s hot, brown the lamb in 2 or 3 batches, transferring to a plate as you go. Set aside.

Add the onion, garlic and ginger to a food processor and whizz to a smooth paste, adding a tablespoon or two of cold water to help it along, if necessary.

Lower the heat on the empty pan and add the cumin, fennel, chilli flakes and cinnamon stick, frying for a few seconds until you can smell their aroma wafting up from the pan. Stir through the onion paste and fry for 10 minutes until starting to soften. Return all the meat and any juices to the pan, along with the tomatoes and garam masala. Season with salt and pepper, pour in 500ml water and bring to the boil. Cover with a lid, reduce the heat to low and simmer gently for about an hour, until the meat is nearly tender. Add the potatoes, re-cover and simmer for another 30 minutes or so until the potatoes are cooked.

While the curry is simmering, slice the tops off the bread rolls and scoop out the insides to leave a shell about 1cm thick all round. Reserve the insides for dunking in the curry.

When the curry has finished cooking, divide evenly between the hollow rolls. Garnish with a little coriander and a few onion slices and eat immediately – cutlery optional!

Credit: MasterChef: Street Food of the World by Genevieve Taylor with recipes from previous MasterChef winners worldwide (Absolute Press, £26)

Photography © David Loftus

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Black-eyed peas with tamarind and coconut

Anjula’s World of Daal! More recipes like this in issue 28 of Chaat! 

Daal’s the store cupboard ingredients that can trigger your taste buds and culinary skills!

Anjula’s tells Chaat!, “I have always loved daal; for me it’s the ultimate delicious comfort food. I’m not quite sure why many people in the UK don’t appreciate the myriad benefits of lentils and pulses. Not only are these beautiful gems full of nutritional value, they are affordable, sustainable and healthy. Chana daal, for example, is incredibly low in GI and is great for diabetics”.

If you search online for ‘black-eyed peas,’ you’ll find lots of results for the famous American hip-hop band as well as for these wonderful beans – that’s right, they are actually beans rather than peas. Known as ‘lobia’ in Hindi and Punjabi, black-eyed peas combined with coconut milk make this dish a real delight. You can use dry black-eyed peas, but do remember to soak them overnight. They are delicious eaten hot or cold and come with some impressive nutritional benefits.

Serves 4

Ingredients

Key Spices

1 Indian bay leaf

1 1 inch piece of cassia bark

1 tsp turmeric powder

1 tsp red chilli flakes

1 tsp crushed coriander seeds

1 tsp cumin seeds

Warming Spices

1 tsp fennel seeds

2 cloves

4 green cardamom, lightly bashed

Other Spices

1/2 tsp ajwain seeds

Wet Ingredients

2 tbs vegetable oil

2 onions, finely chopped

3 fresh tomatoes, chopped

2-3 green chillies, pierced

1 tsp fresh pulped ginger

2 tsp fresh pulped garlic

2 400 g tins of black-eyed peas, rinsed and drained

200 ml coconut milk

2 tbs tamarind paste

Sea salt to taste

1tsp grated jaggery

Garnish

Small bunch of fresh coriander, chopped

Method 

Heat a sauté pan, with a lid, on a medium heat and warm the vegetable oil. Add the onions and sauté for 3 minutes.

Add the Indian bay leaf, cassia bark and salt to taste. Continue to sauté for 5 minutes, then add the turmeric powder, red chilli flakes, tomatoes and jaggery. Stir well and continue to sauté gently on a low heat for 10 minutes.

Add the green chillies, garlic and ginger and sauté for 2 minutes.

Place a small pan on a low heat and gently warm the crushed coriander seeds, cumin seeds and ajwain seeds for 1 minute. Remove from the heat and add to the onions and tomatoes.

In the same small pan, warm the warming spices on a low heat for 1 minute. Set aside.

Add the black-eyed peas, stir really well and cook for 3 minutes.

Add the coconut milk, bring to the boil and immediately reduce to a simmer.

Add the warming spices and tamarind paste, then place the lid on the pan and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from the heat, add the chopped coriander and serve with basmati rice.

Recipe by Anjula Devi

NB – remember to count the cloves and cardamoms in and then count them out again before serving.

 

Piercing your fresh chillies with a cocktail stick gives you more control over the warmth of your dish. If you like your dish hot, then simply chop the chillies rather than pierce them. 

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Celebrate #Pakistani Cuisine with Shehzad Hussain a perfect #recipe for #Easter

Further recipes and interview in Chaat! issue 28

NEHARI

LAMB NEHARI

Regarded as the national dish of Pakistan, nehari is known for its piquancy

and texture. The name has its origins in Arabic and means ‘day’ or ‘morning’

and it was typically served to kings and nobility around sunrise, after the

Muslim early morning Fajr prayer. The Mughals brought it to the Indian

subcontinent and it soon became a nationwide tradition among the Muslims.

The dish comprises slow-cooked large, tender shanks or pieces of beef,

mutton or lamb and, while not completely authentic, even chicken. Known

for its spiciness, it is a delicious curry with a thick, flavoursome sauce that is

often sold with naan fresh from the tandoor in specialist restaurants and

roadside cafes early in the morning, particularly on weekends.

 

SERVES 4

2 medium onions, peeled and halved

120ml/4fl oz/1⁄2 cup vegetable oil

2 bay leaves

900g/2lb leg of lamb on the bone, cut into 7.5–10cm/3–4in cubes, or 3–4 medium lamb shanks

15ml/1 tbsp garam masala

15ml/1 tbsp ground coriander

10ml/2 tsp garlic pulp

10ml/2 tsp ginger pulp

5ml/1 tsp freshly grated nutmeg

10ml/2 tsp ground fennel seeds

10ml/2 tsp paprika

30ml/2 tbsp tomato paste

7.5ml/11⁄2 tsp salt

1 litre/13⁄4 pints/4 cups water, plus 60ml/4 tbsp to make a flour paste

30ml/2 tbsp plain (all-purpose) flour

15ml/1 tbsp chopped fresh coriander (cilantro)

2 lemons, cut into wedges, to serve

naan or parathas, to serve

TO GARNISH

4–6 fresh green chillies, chopped

45ml/3 tbsp chopped fresh coriander (cilantro)

45ml/3 tbsp peeled and finely sliced fresh root ginger

 

1 Process the onions in a food processor to form a pulp.

2 Heat 60ml/4 tbsp of the oil in a very large pan over a medium heat and fry the

bay leaves for about 30 seconds. Add the meat, followed by the garam masala.

Fry for about 5 minutes, to seal the meat.

3 Add the ground coriander, garlic, ginger, nutmeg, ground fennel seeds,

paprika and tomato paste and stir to combine. Add the salt and stir once more,

then remove from the heat.

4 In a separate pan, heat the remaining oil over a medium heat, add the pulped

onion and fry for about 10 minutes, until golden brown.

5 Add the onion pulp to the lamb and combine everything together. Pour in the

water, return to the heat and bring to the boil.

6 Reduce the heat to low and cook for 45–60 minutes, checking occasionally and

stirring. The curry is ready once the liquid has reduced by at least half and the

meat is tender and falling off the bone.

7 Dissolve the flour in the 60ml/4 tbsp water, whisking it well to make a smooth

paste. Pour this over the lamb while slowly and gently stirring the curry. Cook for

a further 7–10 minutes, stirring frequently, until the sauce is thick.

8 Using a ladle, transfer the curry to a serving dish, or individual deep plates if

using shanks – allowing one per person. Serve garnished with chillies, fresh

coriander, and ginger, and accompany with lemon wedges, and naan or parathas.

The Food and Cooking of Pakistan: Traditional Dishes From The Home Kitchen by Shehzad Husain (HB, Lorenz Books, Dec-16, £14.99) is available now on Amazon.co.uk

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Slow Cooked Cumin and Coriander Spiced Vegetables with Pearl Barley

This rich and flavoursome veggie stew is a great way to experiment with your rice cooker, demonstrating that this must-have kitchen gadget can do more than serve up bowls of fluffy basmati. Autumnal veg and piquant spices create a wonderful, and surprisingly light, stew full of delicious flavours and delightful textures.

Vegetarian and vegan friendly, the slow cooked cumin and coriander spiced vegetables with pearl barley proves that hearty dishes needn’t rely on a meaty base.

Quick and easy to make, and a hit with the whole family; this recipe is great for a midweek meal. Using a lot of kitchen essentials and spice rack mainstays, the recipe won’t add a great deal of burden on your weekly shopping list. Plus, if you’ve got young children, this is a great way of getting them to eat a number of veggies they’re usually reluctant to sample.

We’d recommend serving this dish with fresh, crusty bread on the side – great for dipping, scooping and wiping – making sure you don’t miss any of the wonderful spice. Serve direct from the rice cooker, when the vegetables and pearl barley are piping hot.

Here is the recipe for slow cooked cumin and coriander spiced vegetables with pearl barley.

Cook Time: 30 Minutes

Servings: 4-6 People

Ingredients:

  • 1 small squash (peeled, cut into chunks)
  • 2 cups fine beans (topped, tailed and halved)
  • 2 courgettes (sliced)
  • 2 leeks (sliced)
  • 5 carrots (peeled and sliced)
  • 1 medium red onion (sliced)
  • 600g chopped tomatoes
  • 80g pearl barley
  • 1tsp cumin seeds
  • 1tsp coriander seeds
  • 1tsp dried chilli flakes
  • 3 cups vegetable stock
  • 2tbsp vegetable oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • Crusty bread (to serve)

Method:

 Using your rice cooker, sauté the carrots, courgettes, squash and red onion in the vegetable oil.

  1. After a couple of minutes, add the chopped tomatoes, pearl barley, spices and vegetable stock.
  2. Switch to cook mode and cover, cooking for 15 minutes.
  3. Stir in the leeks and beans, cover again and cook for a further 10 minutes.
  4. Serve with the fresh, crusty bread.

Original recipe from: www.crockpot.co.uk

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Anjula Devi’s Healthy Indian Inspired Christmas Feast

For anyone looking forward to enjoying a Christmas with a difference, chef and author, Anjula Devi, has created a Christmas feast with hints of carefully selected spices, all containing amazing health properties. Anjula’s Christmas banquet features:

  • Caramelised carrots with chilli flakes, jaggery and smoked ginger juice. Finished with a drop of orange liquor.
  •  Sticky parsnips with maple syrup and mandarin peel. Finished with nigella seeds.
  •  Roast potatoes with burnt garlic, cumin and red onion.
  •  Brussels sprouts with crushed coriander seeds, fennel and twice-roasted chestnuts in butter and garlic.
  •  24 hour marinated roast turkey with garlic, cumin, roasted dry crushed chillies, crushed coriander seeds, natural yogurt, pomegranate, lemon zest and juice. Finished with fresh chopped   coriander.
  •  Sausages wrapped in bacon, with caramelised shallots and fenugreek leaves
  •  Cranberry sauce with a hint of star anise and black peppercorns.
  •  Bread sauce with cinnamon, cloves, bay leaf and roasted onion. Finished with a little chilli oil.

Celebrated chef and champion of authentic Indian cooking, Anjula Devi is head of her own eponymous ‘Authentic Indian Cookery School’. Anjula has never been one to follow the crowd, and she loves creating healthy and unique recipes.

This talent began as a gift shared by her beloved father during a childhood in which he imparted all of his culinary wisdom. The essential spices, which form the foundation of much traditional Indian cuisine, remain central to Anjula’s culinary approach. The fifty-year-old Tiffin tin, which her father took with him to work every single day, is always close by, even today.

Speaking about Indian cuisine, Anjula says “There is a whole treasure chest of recipes, flavour combinations and beautiful ingredients which are often completely neglected, along with all of their amazing health benefits. All of my recipes are balanced and healthy; I love cooking with fresh vegetables. I want to inspire as many people as possible to cook delicious, healthy food, just like my father did all those years ago.”

Anjula’s Indian inspired Christmas dishes make a great alternative to traditional roast dinners.

Anjula has a ‘How To’ cookery book and range of Anjula Devi cooking utensils currently online and in Lakeland stores throughout the UK. http://www.lakeland.co.uk/anjula

Her new cookery book ‘Spice for Life’ is being released in spring 2017

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