Pea and Aubergine Curry #GreatBritishPeaWeek

Nutritional information

PER SERVING (4): 106 kcalories, 7g protein, 13g carbohydrates, 9g fat, 0g saturated fat, 8g fibre, 5g sugars, 0.05g sodium.

Nutrition – as well as the nutritional value of the Peas this recipe contains: Beta carotene, vitamin C, folic acid, calcium, magnesium, allicin plus other antioxidants from the herbs and spices.

Ingredients

2 tbsp sunflower oil

2 tsp black mustard seeds

1 tsp cumin seeds

1 tsp turmeric

2 tsp ground coriander

1 tsp ground cumin

2 tsp peeled fresh ginger finely crushed

2 tsp green chilli finely chopped

2 tsp garlic finely crushed

2 tbsp tomato puree

300ml water

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 large aubergines cut into 3cm cubes

400g frozen peas

Method

Heat the oil in a pan. Add the mustard and cumin seeds. When the seeds pop add the rest of the spices, crushed ginger, green chilli and garlic. Add the tomato puree and a little of the water. Blend to a smooth paste and then add the rest of the water. Season to taste with sea salt and black pepper. Let the mixture simmer for about 5 mins then add the aubergine chunks and coat well with the sauce. Cover the pan and allow to cook/steam for about 12 mins on a low heat, stirring frequently adding more water if necessary. Add the peas and cook for a further 8 – 10 minutes stirring frequently.

Serve with cooked brown Basmati rice and garnish with fresh coriander.

Serves 4

Tips

The less water you use when cooking peas, the less vitamin C is lost. Steaming helps to conserve this vitamin.

When boiling frozen peas, add enough water to cover, bring to the boil and then cover and simmer for 3 minutes. To microwave 227 grams (8oz) of frozen peas add 15ml (1 tablespoon) of water, place in a non-metallic container and cover. Cook on full power for 4 minutes (750W) or 4 1/2 minutes (650W)

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GREAT BRITISH PEA WEEK IS BACK! The UK’s annual celebration of the British pea harvesting season will take  place from 10 – 16th July -Mild Pea and Sweet Potato Curry

Mild Pea and Sweet Potato Curry

Nutritional information

PER SERVING (4) 600 kcalories, 7g protein, 35g carbohydrates, 8g fat, 1g saturated fat, 7g fibre, 13g sugars, 0.04g sodium.

Nutrition – as well as the nutritional value of the Peas this recipe contains: vitamin A and beta carotene, B complex vitamins, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin K, calcium, magnesium, iron, selenium, zinc, manganese, potassium, quercitin, allicin, lycopene plus other antioxidants from the herbs and seasonings.

Ingredients

2 tbsp vegetable or rapeseed oil

500g sweet potato, peeled and cut into large dice

1 red onion, peeled and finely chopped

2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed

2 cm piece root ginger, peeled and finely chopped

1 tsp ground cumin

2 tbsp mild Korma curry paste

1 tin chopped tomatoes

200ml chicken / vegetable stock

sea salt and black pepper

300g frozen peas

Juice 1/2 lemon

Handful coriander, roughly chopped

To serve: naan bread, basmati rice, natural yoghurt, chutney / pickle

Method

Heat the oil in a large casserole or deep frying pan. Add the sweet potato and red onion and fry for 5 – 10 minutes, until the vegetables are starting to colour. Add the garlic and ginger and cook for a further minute. Add the ground cumin and curry paste and cook, stirring constantly, for another minute. Add the tinned tomatoes and blend in the stock. Season with sea salt and black pepper and bring to the boil.

Simmer gently for 20 minutes, stirring regularly and topping up with extra stock if necessary, until the sweet potato has softened and is cooked through. Stir in the frozen peas and cook for a further 3 minutes. Adjust the seasoning and add the lemon juice. Stir through the chopped coriander and serve with steamed basmati rice, warm naan bread, yoghurt and chutney.

Serves 4

Preparation Time 10 minutes

Cooking Time 30 minutes

Tips

The less water you use when cooking peas, the less vitamin C is lost. Steaming helps to conserve this vitamin.

When boiling frozen peas, add enough water to cover, bring to the boil and then cover and simmer for 3 minutes. To microwave 227 grams (8oz) of frozen peas add 15ml (1 tablespoon) of water, place in a non-metallic container and cover. Cook on full power for 4 minutes (750W) or 4 1/2 minutes (650W)

Launched by the Yes Peas! campaign and the British pea vining industry, Great British Pea Week (10 – 16th July), the National Awareness Week dedicated to peas, has returned for 2017, giving everyone a reason to celebrate peas this harvesting season.

The UK is the largest producer and consumer of frozen peas in Europe, with the average person in Britain eating nearly 9,000 peas per year. This July, approximately 700 pea growers will harvest 2 billion portions of peas to feed Britain for the year.

Great British Pea Week is here to celebrate British production of the nation’s favourite family vegetable and inform the Great British public about the dedication it takes every pea season to get billions of peas from field to fork.

Lasting an average of six to eight weeks, the harvesting process is a complex operation. Farmers work 24 hours a day, 7 days a week using viners to harvest, shell and transport the peas from field to frozen as quickly as possible – the majority in just 150 minutes.

Stephen Francis, member of the YesPeas! campaign, said: “Great British Pea Week is back for its second year to inspire the nation to cook with peas during harvest season and reconnect people with the important heritage and provenance of frozen peas and their fascinating journey from the field to our freezers.

“The locked in freshness of frozen peas means we can enjoy British peas all year round, however we hope to remind consumers that growing peas is a mainstay of livelihood many British farmers and very much a product of the seasons!

“Great British Pea Week is here to put peas firmly on the food agenda and give everyone a reason to enjoy this versatile and nutritional vegetable at the peak of the British harvesting season, as well as all year-round.”

The hi-tech machinery and exact precision needed during harvesting requires growers to collaborate to produce the crop. There are currently 18 farmer groups along the east coast of the UK, from Essex to North of Dundee who produce the wonderful pea. The east-facing seaboard and maritime climate is the perfect environment for growing superior quality peas.

Versatile and nutritious, frozen peas are a popular freezer essential and the Yes Peas! campaign is asking everyone to get involved this Great British Pea Week and get cooking with peas. TV chef and Yes Peas! ambassador, Rachel Green has created some recipes to inspire everyone this Great British Pea Week, available at www.peas.org.

 

 

ABOUT YES PEAS!

The highly successful Yes Peas! campaign, run by the British Growers Association and funded by growers, freezers and machinery companies from the vining pea sector, is in its eleventh year. The campaign aims to promote the versatility, provenance and nutritional benefits of frozen peas and engages with consumers to inspire them to use peas as an ingredient, as well as an accompaniment, to meals. The campaign is supported by hundreds of recipes developed by campaign ambassador and TV chef, Rachel Green, available at www.peas.org.

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Bunny chow #StreetFood South African Curry

Street food has become so popular over the last decade in the UK, but there are still many regions of street food still to be explored by UK diners, here is recipe from South Africa!

Bunny chow is simply a hollow bread roll stuffed with curry – not made with real bunny, but with tender pieces of stewed lamb. In its native South Africa it is often spooned into large hollowed-out loaves of bread, which are designed to be eaten with your hands – quite a challenge, even for the most dextrous! For ease of eating I prefer to use smaller rolls, so really hungry diners may want more than one.

Order your copy of Chaat! to get more recipes like this 

SERVES 4–8, ALLOWING 1–2 EACH, DEPENDING ON GREED

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

700g lamb leg steaks, cut into 3cm cubes

2 onions, roughly chopped

3 garlic cloves, chopped

4cm piece fresh root ginger, chopped

1 tablespoon cumin seeds

2 teaspoons fennel seeds

1–2 teaspoons dried chilli flakes, to taste

1 cinnamon stick

4 vine tomatoes, chopped

2 tablespoons garam masala

550–600g (around 2 large)

potatoes, peeled and cut into 3cm cubes

8 large crusty white bread rolls

salt and freshly ground black pepper

a small bunch of coriander, chopped, to garnish

1 small red onion, thinly sliced, to garnish

Spices for the recipe go to store.eastendfoods.co.uk/

Place the vegetable oil in a large, heavy-based pan and set over a high heat. When it’s hot, brown the lamb in 2 or 3 batches, transferring to a plate as you go. Set aside.

Add the onion, garlic and ginger to a food processor and whizz to a smooth paste, adding a tablespoon or two of cold water to help it along, if necessary.

Lower the heat on the empty pan and add the cumin, fennel, chilli flakes and cinnamon stick, frying for a few seconds until you can smell their aroma wafting up from the pan. Stir through the onion paste and fry for 10 minutes until starting to soften. Return all the meat and any juices to the pan, along with the tomatoes and garam masala. Season with salt and pepper, pour in 500ml water and bring to the boil. Cover with a lid, reduce the heat to low and simmer gently for about an hour, until the meat is nearly tender. Add the potatoes, re-cover and simmer for another 30 minutes or so until the potatoes are cooked.

While the curry is simmering, slice the tops off the bread rolls and scoop out the insides to leave a shell about 1cm thick all round. Reserve the insides for dunking in the curry.

When the curry has finished cooking, divide evenly between the hollow rolls. Garnish with a little coriander and a few onion slices and eat immediately – cutlery optional!

Credit: MasterChef: Street Food of the World by Genevieve Taylor with recipes from previous MasterChef winners worldwide (Absolute Press, £26)

Photography © David Loftus

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Black-eyed peas with tamarind and coconut

Anjula’s World of Daal! More recipes like this in issue 28 of Chaat! 

Daal’s the store cupboard ingredients that can trigger your taste buds and culinary skills!

Anjula’s tells Chaat!, “I have always loved daal; for me it’s the ultimate delicious comfort food. I’m not quite sure why many people in the UK don’t appreciate the myriad benefits of lentils and pulses. Not only are these beautiful gems full of nutritional value, they are affordable, sustainable and healthy. Chana daal, for example, is incredibly low in GI and is great for diabetics”.

If you search online for ‘black-eyed peas,’ you’ll find lots of results for the famous American hip-hop band as well as for these wonderful beans – that’s right, they are actually beans rather than peas. Known as ‘lobia’ in Hindi and Punjabi, black-eyed peas combined with coconut milk make this dish a real delight. You can use dry black-eyed peas, but do remember to soak them overnight. They are delicious eaten hot or cold and come with some impressive nutritional benefits.

Serves 4

Ingredients

Key Spices

1 Indian bay leaf

1 1 inch piece of cassia bark

1 tsp turmeric powder

1 tsp red chilli flakes

1 tsp crushed coriander seeds

1 tsp cumin seeds

Warming Spices

1 tsp fennel seeds

2 cloves

4 green cardamom, lightly bashed

Other Spices

1/2 tsp ajwain seeds

Wet Ingredients

2 tbs vegetable oil

2 onions, finely chopped

3 fresh tomatoes, chopped

2-3 green chillies, pierced

1 tsp fresh pulped ginger

2 tsp fresh pulped garlic

2 400 g tins of black-eyed peas, rinsed and drained

200 ml coconut milk

2 tbs tamarind paste

Sea salt to taste

1tsp grated jaggery

Garnish

Small bunch of fresh coriander, chopped

Method 

Heat a sauté pan, with a lid, on a medium heat and warm the vegetable oil. Add the onions and sauté for 3 minutes.

Add the Indian bay leaf, cassia bark and salt to taste. Continue to sauté for 5 minutes, then add the turmeric powder, red chilli flakes, tomatoes and jaggery. Stir well and continue to sauté gently on a low heat for 10 minutes.

Add the green chillies, garlic and ginger and sauté for 2 minutes.

Place a small pan on a low heat and gently warm the crushed coriander seeds, cumin seeds and ajwain seeds for 1 minute. Remove from the heat and add to the onions and tomatoes.

In the same small pan, warm the warming spices on a low heat for 1 minute. Set aside.

Add the black-eyed peas, stir really well and cook for 3 minutes.

Add the coconut milk, bring to the boil and immediately reduce to a simmer.

Add the warming spices and tamarind paste, then place the lid on the pan and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from the heat, add the chopped coriander and serve with basmati rice.

Recipe by Anjula Devi

NB – remember to count the cloves and cardamoms in and then count them out again before serving.

 

Piercing your fresh chillies with a cocktail stick gives you more control over the warmth of your dish. If you like your dish hot, then simply chop the chillies rather than pierce them. 

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Celebrate #Pakistani Cuisine with Shehzad Hussain a perfect #recipe for #Easter

Further recipes and interview in Chaat! issue 28

NEHARI

LAMB NEHARI

Regarded as the national dish of Pakistan, nehari is known for its piquancy

and texture. The name has its origins in Arabic and means ‘day’ or ‘morning’

and it was typically served to kings and nobility around sunrise, after the

Muslim early morning Fajr prayer. The Mughals brought it to the Indian

subcontinent and it soon became a nationwide tradition among the Muslims.

The dish comprises slow-cooked large, tender shanks or pieces of beef,

mutton or lamb and, while not completely authentic, even chicken. Known

for its spiciness, it is a delicious curry with a thick, flavoursome sauce that is

often sold with naan fresh from the tandoor in specialist restaurants and

roadside cafes early in the morning, particularly on weekends.

 

SERVES 4

2 medium onions, peeled and halved

120ml/4fl oz/1⁄2 cup vegetable oil

2 bay leaves

900g/2lb leg of lamb on the bone, cut into 7.5–10cm/3–4in cubes, or 3–4 medium lamb shanks

15ml/1 tbsp garam masala

15ml/1 tbsp ground coriander

10ml/2 tsp garlic pulp

10ml/2 tsp ginger pulp

5ml/1 tsp freshly grated nutmeg

10ml/2 tsp ground fennel seeds

10ml/2 tsp paprika

30ml/2 tbsp tomato paste

7.5ml/11⁄2 tsp salt

1 litre/13⁄4 pints/4 cups water, plus 60ml/4 tbsp to make a flour paste

30ml/2 tbsp plain (all-purpose) flour

15ml/1 tbsp chopped fresh coriander (cilantro)

2 lemons, cut into wedges, to serve

naan or parathas, to serve

TO GARNISH

4–6 fresh green chillies, chopped

45ml/3 tbsp chopped fresh coriander (cilantro)

45ml/3 tbsp peeled and finely sliced fresh root ginger

 

1 Process the onions in a food processor to form a pulp.

2 Heat 60ml/4 tbsp of the oil in a very large pan over a medium heat and fry the

bay leaves for about 30 seconds. Add the meat, followed by the garam masala.

Fry for about 5 minutes, to seal the meat.

3 Add the ground coriander, garlic, ginger, nutmeg, ground fennel seeds,

paprika and tomato paste and stir to combine. Add the salt and stir once more,

then remove from the heat.

4 In a separate pan, heat the remaining oil over a medium heat, add the pulped

onion and fry for about 10 minutes, until golden brown.

5 Add the onion pulp to the lamb and combine everything together. Pour in the

water, return to the heat and bring to the boil.

6 Reduce the heat to low and cook for 45–60 minutes, checking occasionally and

stirring. The curry is ready once the liquid has reduced by at least half and the

meat is tender and falling off the bone.

7 Dissolve the flour in the 60ml/4 tbsp water, whisking it well to make a smooth

paste. Pour this over the lamb while slowly and gently stirring the curry. Cook for

a further 7–10 minutes, stirring frequently, until the sauce is thick.

8 Using a ladle, transfer the curry to a serving dish, or individual deep plates if

using shanks – allowing one per person. Serve garnished with chillies, fresh

coriander, and ginger, and accompany with lemon wedges, and naan or parathas.

The Food and Cooking of Pakistan: Traditional Dishes From The Home Kitchen by Shehzad Husain (HB, Lorenz Books, Dec-16, £14.99) is available now on Amazon.co.uk

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